INDUSTRY SESSIONS 

 

We are pleased to announce that the following industry sessions will be taking place during the Meeting.

Please note that breakfast symposia numbers are capped for catering purposes, therefore delegates must register to attend the breakfast symposia online via the registration portal. 

 Lunchtime symposia are free for any delegates who wish to attend on the day. Please collect your lunchbox from the Meeting catering stations and proceed to the symposium. 


 

BioMerieux Breakfast Symposium 
Thursday, 27 February 2020
07:00 - 08:45 am

Detection of Antibiotic Resistance: Genotype or Phenotype?

Since the first development of antibiotics, microbiologists have relied on phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance. However the advent of PCR and subsequently whole genome sequencing has raised the potential for a move to detection of antibiotic resistance genes. But, is there a “Rosetta stone” which can translate complicated genotypes to clinically useful information? Or, will the phenotype (albeit by more rapid means) remain the gold standard for antibiotic resistance detection for years to come?.

Speaker:

Professor David Paterson 

Professor Paterson is Director at The University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research. He is also a Consultant Infectious Diseases Physician at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (Australia's largest hospital and ranked in the top 100 hospitals of the world). He is Australia's most cited Infectious Diseases Physician and has been in the ISI Thomson Reuters Highly Cited List annually from 2015 to 2019.

He received his medical degree and PhD from The University of Queensland. His research focuses on the molecular and clinical epidemiology of infections with antibiotic resistant organisms, with the intent of translation of knowledge into optimal prevention and treatment of these infections. He now has added clinical trials to his research portfolio and has recently conducted the world’s largest trial on antibiotics for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing bacterial infections (the "MERINO trial").


 

BD Breakfast Symposium 
Friday, 28 February 2020
07:00 - 08:45 am

Diagnostic Testing – Combating Antimicrobial Resistance

Agenda : 

Using Genomics to Combat Hospital Antimicrobial Resistance
Professor Ben Howden

Combating Antimicrobial Resistance through the Hospital Microbiology Laboratory
Professor Deborah Williamson

Speakers:

Professor Ben Howden 

Professor Ben Howden is Director of the Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory and Medical Director of the Doherty Centre for Applied Microbial Genomics. In his roles, he is responsible for the provision of public health laboratory services, the translation of microbial genomics into public health and clinical microbiology practice, and research investigating antimicrobial resistance and bacterial pathogenesis.

Professor Deborah Williamson 

Professor Deborah Williamson is a Clinical and Public Health Microbiologist, Director of Microbiology at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Deputy Director of the Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory at the Doherty Institute, and a laboratory head in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Melbourne.  Her research group at the Doherty Institute focuses on the application of genomic technologies to clinical microbiology and public health, with a strong focus on antimicrobial resistant pathogens. She is an NHMRC Investigator Grant recipient, and received a L’Oreal-UNESCO Women in Science Fellowship in 2017.She has served on numerous national advisory groups and committees, and has been an invited speaker at both national and international research symposia and conferences.


 

Abbott Breakfast Symposium 
Saturday, 29 February 2020
07:00 - 08:45 am


The Science of the Healthy Microbiome 

Abbott is delighted to be hosting a breakfast symposium, “The science of the healthy microbiome”, during the Australian Society for Antimicrobials Annual Scientific Meeting, Antimicrobials 2020.

The gut microbiome has gained considerable attention in recent years with disruption of the microbiome now linked to a range of conditions including obesity, allergies and anxiety. A key cause of microbiome disruption is antibiotic use. As more becomes known about the impacts of the gut microbiome on general health, the importance of appropriate prescribing is even more evident. Despite the complexity of the issue, it has been recognised that the right diagnostic tools to guide appropriate prescribing in a timely fashion are critical.

Norman Moore will kick start the morning with an in-depth look at the impact of disruption to the gut microbiome. Dr Michelle Balm will conclude the session, presenting a practical solution to diagnosing influenza at the point-of-care to help ensure appropriate prescribing, infection control and patient management.

Agenda : 

Don’t take that antibiotic. You might get…fat? The overuse of antibiotics meets the science of healthy microbiomes.
Norman Moore

ID NOWTM - How point-of-care influenza testing can be used in real world settings.
Dr Michelle Balm 

Speakers:

Dr Michelle Balm Clinical Leader & Infectious Diseases Physician, Capital & Coast District Health BoardClinical Microbiologist, Wellington Southern Community Laboratories

Dr Michelle Balm (MBChB (Otago), DTM&H (Liverpool), FRACP, FRCPA) is an Infectious Diseases physician and Clinical Microbiologist based in Wellington. Her undergraduate degree was through Otago University. She completed her training in Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology in New Zealand and Singapore. Her current role is as Clinical Leader for Infection Services and Chair of the Infection Prevention and Control Committee at Capital & Coast District Health Board and Clinical Microbiologist at Wellington Southern Community Laboratories in Wellington, New Zealand. She has a strong interest in diagnostic innovation, choosing wisely, antimicrobial resistance, antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control.

Norman Moore Director of Infectious Diseases Scientific Affairs, Abbott

Norman received his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth and his PhD in microbiology from the University of New Hampshire. He has eight US and 39 non-US patents in the field of infectious disease diagnostics along with numerous publications and presentations. He currently sits on medical committees such as the point-of-care groups for the College of American Pathology and the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and helps write guidelines/best practices for additional groups. Currently, he is the global director of scientific affairs for the Rapid Diagnostic division of Abbott Laboratories.


 

Cepheid Lunchtime Symposium 
Thursday, 27 February 2020
12:15 - 13.15 pm

Antimicrobial Stewardship: What would you do with the RIGHT results?

Agenda : 

Mycoplasma genitalium: Biology, Diagnosis and Management.
Dr Charles P Cartwright 

Keeping Pace with Evolving Bacterial Genomes: Xpert® MRSA/SA BC
Dr Alicia Beukers 

Speaker:

 Dr Charles P Cartwright
VP, Scientific Affairs, SpeeDx Pty Ltd

Dr Alicia Beukers 
Medical Laboratory Scientist, Microbiology Laboratory, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney

 

 

MSD Lunchtime Symposium 

Friday, 28 February 2020
12:00 - 13:30 pm

If it aint broke, don’t fix it
Why new policies are needed to ensure a future pipeline of antibiotics 

MSD invites you to be part of an important discussion on the role of effective antibiotic funding models, to sustain a future pipeline of antibiotics and support patient access to antimicrobial innovations.

In this session, we will hear from a diverse range of stakeholders; Professor David Paterson will chair a panel from different spheres - health economics, clinical, industry and health policy. Professor Adrian Towse from the Office of Health Economics in the UK (also doing a keynote presentation on the Thursday of the meeting), will offer a global perspective not only on the challenges of the current environment, but also on potential solutions.

We encourage you to join us at this lunchtime session and be part of the conversation.

Speaker:

Professor Adrian Towse
Director Emeritus of the Office of Health Economics in the UK


 

Australian Safety and Quality in Health Care Commission Lunch Symposium 
Saturday, 29 February 2020
12:00 - 13:00 pm

 

Long Term Trends in AMR: VRE and ESBLs

Speakers:

Professor John Turnidge

Professor John Turnidge AO will facilitate the symposium on long term trends for vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) and extended-spectrum β-lactamases, based on data contributed to the Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Australia (AURA) Surveillance System by the Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) and Australian Passive AMR Surveillance.

Associate Professor Sebastian van Hal,  Infectious Diseases Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, will present AGAR data on VRE and the emergence of vanA as the dominant genotype

Associate Professor Sebastian van Hal will present AGAR data on VRE and the emergence of vanA as the dominant genotype

Professor Thomas Gottlieb, Head, Infectious Diseases, Concord Hospital, will present AGAR and APAS data on ESBLs.


 

 Hologic Lunchtime Symposium 
Saturday, 29 February 2020
12:00 - 13.00 pm

Panther Fusion: Ready to Pounce on the Next Outbreak with Open Access

In 2019 NZ experienced a large outbreak of measles, including the Southern region.  Whilst our laboratory is located within the Southern region, we do not offer measles PCR testing.  Transportation of samples to the testing laboratory leads to a delay in results, which is not ideal from a Public Health perspective when they are trying to contain an outbreak.  Our laboratory has a Panther Fusion®.  In an attempt to avoid delays in results in future outbreaks, we have developed a measles assay to run as an LDT on the Panther Fusion® Open Access System. This talk will describe the optimisation of the LDT for Measles and cellular control using the WHO primers/probes. We also demonstrated proof of concept that the LDT and the IVD assays can be processed side-by-side with full automation from the same sample or from the same eluate, aiding the clinicians in the diagnosis. 

Speaker:

Jenny Grant

Jenny is the Manager of the Molecular Pathology Department at Southern Community Laboratories, Dunedin, New Zealand. She received her bachelor’s degree and her PhD in Molecular and Gene regulation from the University of Otago. Jenny currently does consultation on the Molecular content for second-year level and teaches fourth-year Molecular programme for the University of Otago Medical Laboratory Science Programme. Jenny is passionate about expanding the range of tests performed in the Molecular department in Dunedin and advancing the department with the rapidly evolving molecular technologies. She is also passionate about providing appropriate access to molecular tests throughout the wider Healthscope laboratory network in New Zealand.