International Bullying Prevention Conference
 
Cognitive Interviews in Development of Cyberbullying Vignettes

Speaker
Jenny Mischel, PhD student , George Mason University


Description
Cyberbullying behavior remains elusive as online interactions continuously evolve, making it difficult to construct a widely accepted definition (Talwar, Gomez-Garibello & Shariff, 2014; Corcoran, McGuckin & Prentice, 2015). Furthermore, there are subtle differences between cyberbullying and traditional bullying such as anonymity, the potential to reach a widespread audience, and the inability to escape the behavior beyond the school day (Slonje, Smith & Frisen, 2013: Hinduja & Patchin, 2008; Marees & Petermann, 2012). In order to better define the phenomenon and discover the “cut off” that differentiates mean behavior from cyberbullying, vignettes were developed depicting eight types of cyber interactions, each increasing in severity. Initial cognitive interviews have been conducted with middle school students in order to establish reliability and validity of the instrument. In order to triangulate findings from the interviews, cognitive interviews with cyberbullying experts are warranted before proceeding with further cognitive interviews with additional middle school students. Cyberbullying behavior remains elusive as online interactions continuously evolve, making it difficult to construct a widely accepted definition (Talwar, Gomez-Garibello & Shariff, 2014; Corcoran, McGuckin & Prentice, 2015). Furthermore, there are subtle differences between cyberbullying and traditional bullying such as anonymity, the potential to reach a widespread audience, and the inability to escape the behavior beyond the school day (Slonje, Smith & Frisen, 2013: Hinduja & Patchin, 2008; Marees & Petermann, 2012). In order to better define the phenomenon and discover the “cut off” that differentiates mean behavior from cyberbullying, vignettes were developed depicting eight types of cyber interactions, each increasing in severity. Initial cognitive interviews have been conducted with middle school students in order to establish reliability and validity of the instrument. In order to triangulate findings from the interviews, cognitive interviews with cyberbullying experts are warranted before proceeding with further cognitive interviews with additional middle school students.